Cote Brasserie Art Exhibition

Côte Brasserie Discusses The Future of British Art

Côte Brasserie Discusses The Future of British Art

Following Côte’s recent pop-up art event, we caught up with the artists that debuted their masterpieces to discover what inspires them and where they see British art heading in the future.

Name: Tan Liqing

University: UCL Slade School of Fine Art

Website: www.liqingtan.com

Name of piece: ‘Bye, jellyfish’

Medium of piece: Oil on wood panel

What’s your favourite medium to work in? 

Oil paint, watercolour.

When did you realise that you had a passion for art and it was something you wanted to pursue? When I was very young.

Is there anywhere you go or anything that you do for inspiration when you work?

Drafts, and diaries.

Who is your favourite artist and why?

I love lots of different artists, so I don’t really have a favourite one; for example, Michaël Borremans, William Susnel and James Ensor. Their works are filled with life.

Why do you think events like this are important for artists?

Any chances that provide for us to have a better understanding of the current art world are important to me.

What is your piece about and why do you think it represents the future of art?

With a mixed educational background, British art has been a leading professor to me since I came to the Slade. The tutors taught me the spirit of London modern art, which is about being responsible to your own artwork, and surprising yourself. These lines have influenced me to create my painting combination; a bird fly out of an airplane, and random fishes pacing inside a ‘just for decoration’ fish tank. This piece is named ‘Bye, jellyfish’, and it’s meant to transmit an emotional grey to the viewer.

How do you feel the arts have changed over the past 10 years?

The arts are getting more and more variable and interesting.

Where do you see British art heading in the next five years?

The future of British art, as far as I understand, will be more free and independent. It will be symbolic, allowing the viewer to dig out their own experiences within a piece, and it will be experimental.

Who is your biggest inspiration for your art?

Lots of things. My professors, stories, and the natural as well.

Name: Jonny Law

University: Demontfort University

Website: http://www.jonathanlawrenceart.com/

Name of piece: ‘Top knot hipster & rat race’

Medium: Ink and watercolour

What’s your favourite medium to work in? Ink or graphite.

When did you realise that you had a passion for art and it was something you wanted to pursue? As soon as I started drawing as a child. Imagination is a powerful thing.

Is there anywhere you go or anything that you do for inspiration when you work? Podcasts, music and books.

Who is your favourite artist and why? Salvador Dalí when I was young, Francis Bacon now. Many others in between.

Why do you think events like this are important for artists? It gives them a chance to exhibit artwork and get some exposure in an incredibly competitive world.

What is your piece about and why do you think it represents the future of art? 

I think my piece represents both embracing the future and appearing to fight against it. I’m a simple illustrator; I don’t want to adopt digital, but why not?

How do you feel the arts have changed over the past 10 years? More influence from pop culture, more influence from social media. Things have to be marketable and the message often reflects fashion and technology. Really, nothing about the art has changed but the delivery, and the world we live in.

Where do you see British art heading in the next five years? Depends who’s in government.

Who is your biggest inspiration for your art? Anyone weird, the Japanese, a robot.

 

Name: Georgia Munns

University: Central Saint Martins

Website:  http://www.georgiamunns.co.uk/

Name of piece: ‘Industry in rust’

Medium: Screen printing, metal, rust

What’s your favourite medium to work in? I mostly work with analogue techniques such as screen-printing and letterpress because I find it so hands-on.

When did you realise that you had a passion for art and it was something you wanted to pursue? I used to find it so relaxing when I was in school and I never wanted to give up that feeling, so I knew I had to become a creative.

Is there anywhere you go or anything that you do for inspiration when you work? When I need inspiration, I go to the pub or to a bar to be with friends. Once I’m relaxed the ideas flow.

Who is your favourite artist and why? At the moment, it’s Alice Kettle. She works against default settings and manipulates machines to create unique outcomes, which is really cool.

Why do you think events like this are important for artists? It is a great way to get recognised and know that there is support for the arts still.

What is your piece about and why do you think it represents the future of art? The piece is about the future of city landscapes and how they will change but it also represents how we need to keep adapting and reinventing for the future, which applies to art.

How do you feel the arts have changed over the past 10 years? I think the biggest change has been the impact that social media have had on publicity and the advertisement of art. It makes it more approachable and available to everyone.

Where do you see British art heading in the next five years? It’s hard to say, but I think there will be a huge digital influence on art in the future with mixed media outcomes.

Who is your biggest inspiration for your art? My mum. She complains that I don’t make enough art for the house so I’m often inspired by different rooms in the house, working out what I can create for certain spaces.

Name: Holly Kerslake

Website:  https://www.hollykerslake.com/

Name of piece: ‘We can get along’

Medium of piece: Oil on canvas

What’s your favourite medium to work in? Acrylic sheet and light.

When did you realise that you had a passion for art and it was something you wanted to pursue? When I was studying for my A levels, I realised that the subject fascinated in its inability to have ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ answers. I revelled in the freedom and lack of comfort as you never know at the outset whether a piece will be successful. I enjoy the surprises that come from studying art.

Is there anywhere you go or anything that you do for inspiration when you work? I listen to philosophy, psychology and sociology lectures. I particularly enjoy the thoughts of linguists such as Noam Chomsky; the points under discussion appear as if I inherently knew them. However, each idea still surprises me as typically I have not thought consciously about the topics.

Who is your favourite artist and why? A favourite artist is like a favourite item of clothing – they seem to go in and out of fashion. However, I would probably have to say the current artist of choice is Yves Tinguely, particularly Homage to New York. This was a piece he created which was designed to destroy itself in a flurry of madness, sparks and chaos. The sculpture was a playful, mad failure which resulted in a success story. The ‘mad scientist’ aesthetic is reflected in my own sculptural pieces which I am exhibiting in my final-year show, 9–18 June.

Why do you think events like this are important for artists? Artists have a very different career path where you do not just ‘get’ a job, you need to make yourself your own job through opportunities which lead to opportunities. This exhibition allows prime locations for the display of work, giving the ability for emerging artists’ work to reach an entirely new audience.

What is your piece about and why do you think it represents the future of art? My work reflects tense communication between two people as they attempt to collaborate through the exchange of information.

British artists are becoming more ambitious, imagining works that require collaboration with engineers and craftsmen. Having origins in such disparate fields causes tension through differences in practice and a lack of coherency when discussing the creation of these works. My pieces illustrate such a conversation, where the two entities attempt to collaborate, experiencing difficulties, yet through explanation and discussion can work together peacefully and succinctly to create something beautiful.

How do you feel the arts have changed over the past 10 years? That’s a difficult question to answer, but I feel that a general move has been to utilise technological advancements which were previously either idolised from a distance, or feared, as the loss of specialist crafts that became practised purely as hobbies instead of used as sustainable industries.

Where do you see British art heading in the next five years? The future of art lies in collaboration. Artists such as Conrad Shawcross and Michael Llandy are leading us into an age where artists create engineered art that requires specialist skills, utilising skilled craftsmen to create fascinating pieces of work.

Who is your biggest inspiration for your art?

James Carey, in Communication as Culture. Carey speaks about the transmissive theory of communication, which first formed my visualisation of communication as the jigsaw-like image that can be seen in my works.